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Uses of Bamboo

Bamboo is a plant that is best known for its ability to grow very fast. Some species have been known to grow more than 100cm (39 in.) per day! In total there are about 1400 species of Bamboo, which are native to Asia, Australia, Africa and the Americas. However, bamboo has been translocated to many other locations and is now grown throughout much of the world. The largest species of bamboo, often referred to as Giant Bamboo, is the most commonly used for the different applications of bamboo.

Uses of bamboo

  • The most common use of bamboo is for construction. One of its oldest uses in construction is for creating simple suspension bridges. It is also commonly used for creating scaffolding when working on tall buildings. It also plays an important role in basic home construction in some countries, but must be treated to prevent pests. It is also used as a reinforcement for concrete.
  • Bamboo is also commonly used to create furniture with a very distinct style. It has the advantage of being lightweight, yet very strong.
  • Due to its shape and hollowness, bamboo can be made into various types of musical instruments. The most common type of bamboo instrument is a flute.
  • Bamboo can be used as a filter to remove salt from seawater. It can also be used for rudimentary piping where other materials aren’t available.
  • Several companies have found a way to produce a lightweight and strong bicycle frame from bamboo.
  • It can also be used to create fishing rods. Most of the most popular types of fly fishing rods are made from bamboo.
  • Bamboo can also be made into fabric and paper.

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